Monday, 17 October 2016

History of the Bridgewater Canal

The onset of the industrial revolution saw the creation of new ways to transport goods in large quantities economically, swiftly and safely. Before the railways were the canals. One of the first was the Bridgewater canal which ran from Worsley to the industrial hub of Manchester

The canal was commissioned and owned by Francis Egerton, the third Duke of Bridgewater who owned coal mines in Worsley and was desperately in need of a new form of transportation that could cope with the demand for the large quantities of coal that were needed by the factories of Manchester.

Bridgewater Canal

The Bridgewater canal was a pioneer of its time when it opened in July 1761, and set the standard for all those followed. It was the first man made waterway be built without following an existing watercourse and marked the birth of the short but glorious golden reign of the canal which ran from 1760 to 1830, when the speed of the railways rendered the canals a beautiful relic of the industrial age that we still enjoy to today.

Francis Edgerton was a well-traveled young man and spent his youth touring Europe and taking in all it had to offer. In Europe canals were already a widely used form of transport and he was inspired by their use. Upon his return when he was only twenty-three years’ old he presented his bill of intention.

With this new mode of transport came the promise to reduce the price of the transportation of coal. A factor which resulted in the canal gaining huge support from the traders of Manchester and Salford. As the first waterway of its kind in Britain a team of engineers who specialized in working with water were brought together to oversee the creation of the canal.

Photograph of the Bridgewater Canal

James Brindley, a renowned engineer was the lead engineer and its success is thanks to his visionary talents. After many proposed routes which were deemed inviable the final route included the canal crossing the river Irwell via a stone aqueduct.

When putting his proposal to parliament he demonstrated his ideas by making an Aqueduct from a model he made out of cheese. It was given the go ahead but ridiculed by many, many who eventually had to eat their words when it indeed succeeded and became a renowned engineering feat.

From the outset the Bridgewater canal was a huge success, it vastly improved the rate of production in Manchester’s factories thanks to the swift delivery of coal and other essential goods and its banks became a new hub of activity. New warehouses, brick kilns and lime kilns were built on its banks to take full advantage, and it was not long before work began to extend the canal and the building commenced of other canals around the country.

See more information about the Bridgewater Canal on their official homepage, here.

Visit the Bridgewater canal with Busty Manchester companions

Would you like to go and see the canal for yourself? Do you want some company with a beautiful busty lady to make the whole day that much more enjoyable?

An image of the beautiful Escort Amy from Dior Escorts.
Amy - Dior Escorts
We highly recommend you visit Dior Escorts for adult entertainment in this area and many other areas across London:


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